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Robert Smythson, High Great Chamber (Hardwick Hall, Shrewsbery, England), 1591-97

At Hardwick Hall, a sequence of rooms leads to a grand staircase up to the Long Gallery and High Great Chamber on the second floor. This room, where the countess received guests, entertained and sometimes dines, was designed to display a set of Brussels tapestries with the story of Ulysses. The room had enormous windows, ornate fireplaces, and richly carved and painted plaster frieze around the room. The frieze, by the master Abraham Smith, depict Diana and her maiden hunter in a forest where the pursue stags and boars. Near the window bay, the frieze depicts an allegory on the seasons: Venus and Cupid represent spring, Ceres represents the summer. (Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Volume Two. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2008, 724).

— 3 weeks ago with 35 notes
#interiors  #robert smythson  #high great chamber  #hardwick hall  #english renaissance  #sixteenth century architecture  #architecture  #english artists  #english architecture  #country home  #stokstad's art history  #elizabethan architecture  #domestic architecture  #art  #art history 
Robert Smythson, Hardwick Hall (Shrewsbury, England), 1591-97
Henry VIII often sold or gave church land to favored courtiers. To increase support for the Tudor dynasty, Henry and his successors granted titles of line to rich landowners. These people then often built extensive homes and projects to project their newly found wealth. At this time, Elizabethan architecture reflected the Perpendicular Gothic style, with severe walls and broad expanses of glass, although designers modernized the forms by replacing medieval ornament with classical motifs coped from handbooks and other patterns. One of the grandest of all the Elizabethan houses was Hardwick Hall, home of Elizabeth, Count of Shrewsbury. She employed Robert Smythson, English’s first Renaissance professional architect to built the estate. The plan for Hardwick was all new; the medieval great hall became a two-story entrance hall, which rooms arranged symmetrically around it - a not to classical balance. (Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Volume Two. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2008, 738).

Robert Smythson, Hardwick Hall (Shrewsbury, England), 1591-97

Henry VIII often sold or gave church land to favored courtiers. To increase support for the Tudor dynasty, Henry and his successors granted titles of line to rich landowners. These people then often built extensive homes and projects to project their newly found wealth. At this time, Elizabethan architecture reflected the Perpendicular Gothic style, with severe walls and broad expanses of glass, although designers modernized the forms by replacing medieval ornament with classical motifs coped from handbooks and other patterns. One of the grandest of all the Elizabethan houses was Hardwick Hall, home of Elizabeth, Count of Shrewsbury. She employed Robert Smythson, English’s first Renaissance professional architect to built the estate. The plan for Hardwick was all new; the medieval great hall became a two-story entrance hall, which rooms arranged symmetrically around it - a not to classical balance. (Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Volume Two. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2008, 738).

— 3 weeks ago with 1 note
#robert smythson  #hardwick hall  #english renaissance  #sixteenth century architecture  #architecture  #english artists  #renaisance architecture  #english architecture  #country home  #stokstad's art history  #elizabethan architecture  #domestic architecture  #art  #art history 
Jacob Halder, Armor of George Clifford, Third Earl of Cumberland (created in the royal workshop in Greenwich, England), c. 1580-85

Jacob Halder, Armor of George Clifford, Third Earl of Cumberland (created in the royal workshop in Greenwich, England), c. 1580-85

— 3 weeks ago with 1 note
#jacob halder  #armor of george clifford  #artists in the tudor court  #english renaissance  #sixteenth century art  #stokstad's art history  #arms and armor  #art  #art history